Cold Processed Soaps

Wikipedia likes to define soap as “a chemical combination of salts and fatty acids, which is used for different purposes”. This definition was slightly simplified down a few notches in order to help you understand what soaps are. Now, basically, soaps can be used for either washing clothes, your pets, cars, rugs and your body.

Hence, it’d be safe to say that soap comes in different types and form factors. The important thing for you to know is that there are two kinds of soaps, the Hot Processed Soaps and the Cold Processed Soaps. Through this article, you will come to know about the Cold Processed Soaps in a little bit of more detail.

Cold Processed Soap – Intro 101:

Your grandmother probably likes to use this soap without even knowing what it actually is. To her, cold processed soap is like any other bar of soap, but that’s not correct. From a technical perspective, cold processed soap is known as CP soap, which is a result of a balanced amalgamation of fats, sodium hydroxide, salts, oils and beef tallow.

Compared to hot processed soap, the cold category is a result of an extra dedication and pure work of art ‘n science. The interesting factor here is that this category of soap takes the longest amount of time to harden. Do you know why? Consider the following explanation:

-          Cold processed soap starts with the condensed form of a balanced proportion of various elements. When we talk about “condense form”, it means that the elements (sodium hydroxide, fatty acids and etc.) are used to start a chemical reaction. This reaction has to take place and complete itself within the 6 week time period, which is the same amount of time that the soap bar(s) take to harden up.

To further add up to the expense, exclusivity and hype of cold processed soaps, you’re going to need Lye in order to make these soap bars. It might come to you as a shock, but Lye is no longer commercially available in the market. You’ll have to pull those well connected strings if you want to make a bar of Cold Processed soap at your home.

Also, the process of making this soap is very risky. You have to make it in the supervision of an expert. If, by any means, an expert is not available, study the process in depth, before thinking that you’re too confident to take on the project all by yourself.

Cold Processed Soap – A Great Money Making Tool:

Yes, it is true that by starting your own line of cold processed soap bars, you could get rich quickly. The  bright side of the picture says that you’ll be selling that soap to luxury hotels, vacation resorts and to all those people who’re interested in taking care of their skin.

BUT you have to be extremely careful when making this soap. To further show you the full picture here, if your cold pressed soap is going to cause allergic reaction to skin, nose or any other body part, you’ll be caught up by a couple of guys in Armani suits. Your business will be shut down, or you will be heavily charged. The product will have to be called off and there will be a big loss in terms of valuable reputation and profits.

Do remember this fact that investors will no long be interested in dealing with you. And all those “loyal” buyers will be going the opposite way because you just messed up their lives through your lame cold pressed soap bars.

However, given that cold process soaps are made of purest glycerin extracts, the finest oils and the tenderest fragrances, your business can shower big bucks all over you, like none of your competitors’. You can also buy a huge stock of different cold process soap brands, and store them for a couple of years. Later on, you can auction those soap bars for a huge fortune because people would want to buy something that they used to see on those shelves a couple of years ago.

Glycerin is a common by product that is formed automatically when soap is being cooked. What happens in case of hot processed soap, or regular soap, is that the makers actually strip the soap off of glycerin and lye. Hence the soap bar is not capable of moisturizing your skin the way it was originally supposed to. Hence, by all means, if you can go for a better quality of soap, cold processed soap is not something that you’d want to pass up on.